Do socially animated robots just waste energy?

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So today I stumbled across this IEEE spectrum post on Care-o-bot, mark 4. I hadn’t actually come across the previous iterations of Care-o-bots, but I must say, looking at the video of the first attempt, I doubt there is much to be missing out on. Sorry Fraunhofer…

There is a link to a rather fun little promotional video of the robot, and as I watched it, I certainly felt a light hearted joy. The music was upbeat and gently fun, the basic unfolding of the plot was touching, and there is great attention to detail in the animation of the robot. HRI lessons have been picked up well here.

The robot design is simple at the heart. Slick white paint, some LEDs to provide robot specific feedback channels, and two simple dots for eyes. There is a whole host of research from HRI that demonstrates that simple is very effective, when used properly.

I particularly liked the arm movements when the robot is rushing around to get the rose. It certainly helps us empathize with the robot, no questions there. However, there is a price to pay for this. Battery cell technology is certainly coming along, but for robots energy is still a very precious resource.

So, my question, and it’s a philosophical one, and depends on how much you buy into the H in HRI, and of course what function the robot serves. Those rushing around arm movements that clearly conveyed a robot rushing around to achieve a goal. And in turn, given that, you might infer that the goal has quite some importance. They probably required a fair bit of power. Where they value for watts? Was it worth expending all that energy for the robot to rush around? Did they really bring that something truly extra to the robot?

I don’t think that there is a right or a wrong answer, but I think that this does remind us that from a practical perspective (at least for now), energy is precious to robots, and we as robot designers must contemplate whether we are using it most effectively.

Happy musings!

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